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Snow Cat Travel

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Nepal Wildlife & Birding

 

                                                                                       

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To see wildlife in the mountains is where a custom Himalayan nature trek comes into its own. Invariably to stand any chance of seeing anything you need to trek. On a hurried hiking itinerary and with a large group of people often making a total racket, the chances of seeing anything are remote. Sure, if you remember to look up you may just see a Golden Eagle or even a Lammergeir. So, if its Himalayan wildlife you're looking for, we can structure the trekking element to be a less hurried experience and allow more time at locations along the way .

 

The place to start if it's Himalayan wildlife you have in mind are the links to our various EXAMPLE TREKS below, then get in touch so thast we can customise the trek for you so that you're not rushing "from A to B". It's important to let us know that your main reason for venturing into the Nepal Himalayas is to do a nature trek.

 

For the avoidance of doubt, we don't do fixed "join a group treks", we are exclusively private and custom only.

The chances are that wherever you go in Nepal you'll encounter wildlife. Even if looking for natural encounters isn't really your thing, a visit to world famous Chitwan National Park is something to seriously consider for a couple of days. There are around120 Bengal tigers in Chitwan, and also the one-horned rhinoceros, leopard, mugger crocodiles and the increasingly rare gharial, plus an incredible amount of colourful bird life. To visit Chitwan and enjoy a safari and also realise that people live there too is an experience in itself. Certainly if you've been in the Himalayas then the flat, almost sea-level Chitwan region puts Nepal in full perspective.

 

As well as Chitwan, Bardia National Park is excellent for wildlife too. Established in the 1980s, Bardia is both larger and more remote than Chitwan, and as well as tigers, crocodiles etc, the Gangetic river dolphin is also sometimes seen. Being more difficult to reach, Bardia is much quieter than Chitwan, and very much the domain of the more dedicated wildlife enthusiast. Bardia National Park is widely regarded as the best place to see wild tigers in Nepal.

 

Bird watching enthusiasts should flock (sorry...couldn't resist) to the  premier birding destination of Nepal, Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve. There's more to Koshi Tappu than birds, it's one of the last places in Nepal where you can see wild elephants.

 

Close to Kathmandu, the Shivapuri National Park is great for woodland birds that inhabit the forested mountainside, but there are clouded leopards and bears and much, much more here too!

 

Wildlife Safaris - Chitwan, Bardia, Koshi Tappu, Shivapuri

Nature Treks

Example Wildlife Itineraries National Park Map

All meals 'on tour' included

Hand-Crafted to Perfection

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WARNING:High risk of Inspiration

Chitwan Nepal Tiger-Bardia National Park, Nepal Rhino-Chitwan National Park, Nepal Koshi Tappu Nepal Birding

Bardia National Park

Chitwan National Park

Koshi Tappu

Wildife Reserve

Shivapuri National Park

The Jungles

Leopard-Shivapuri National Park

The Himalayas

Classic Himalayan Treks Short Nepal Treks Luxury Lodge Treks

Also see our WHERE TO SEE WILD TIGERS IN NEPAL article

Snow Leopard Treks

Red Panda Treks

Snow Leopard Langtang Red Panda

This stunning snow leopard was captured on camera by a Snow Cat Travel client in the Himalayas. Although there are perhaps 400-500 snow leopards in Nepal, on a "normal" Himalayan trek your chances of seeing one is about zero.

The Himalayas are renowned for red panda's. Just like the snow leopard, on a "normal" trek it's highly unlikely you'd see one as they are found in the dense forests on the slopes of the mountains, which makes them rather difficult to spot by chance.

With both the snow leopard and red panda we consider that the appeal of a snow leopard trek or a red panda trek will be the realm of the knowledgeable, experienced wildlife enthusiast only.

 

It should go without saying that to stand any chance of seeing either a snow leopard in the wild, or a red panda will require a purposeful and dedicated approach i.e. the purpose of a snow leopard trek, or a red panda trek is precisely that. The trek is dedicated to spotting these most rare and elusive of species.

 

It should go with out saying (snow leopard treks particularly) that there will be significant physical challenges and conditions to endure.

 

We work closely with our friends and contacts at the official wildlife conservation bodies and species respective study groups within Nepal and whom will usually provide the most appropriate species specialist to act as the guide, as well as ensuring that a code of conduct is adhered to.

 

For snow leopards we focus on the Annapurna Conservation Area and for red pandas the Langtang National Park.

 

However, we will operate only two private treks (for private parties of six or less) per year for either species and then only if we are satisfied that a responsible, respectful approach will be adopted.

 

Sadly we too have seen those videos on Facetube of people trying to make themselves look great and just for the sake of some "likes", when clearly the animal they are filming is displaying all the signs of fear and has been wantonly disturbed.

 

And, no....we don't have set itineraries for snow leopard treks or red panda treks. It's all about having the flexibility to actively and reasonably seek the species.